Governor – Dawn For Governor http://dawnforgovernor.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 12:00:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dawnforgovernor.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1.png Governor – Dawn For Governor http://dawnforgovernor.org/ 32 32 Bill targets low wages paid by company linked to Governor Kathy Hochul’s husband https://dawnforgovernor.org/bill-targets-low-wages-paid-by-company-linked-to-governor-kathy-hochuls-husband/ Wed, 18 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/bill-targets-low-wages-paid-by-company-linked-to-governor-kathy-hochuls-husband/ State lawmakers want the company that employs Governor Kathy Hochul’s husband to pay its workers more — or risk losing any chance of lucrative contracts at the new Buffalo Bills stadium it forced on US taxpayers State and local to the tune of $850 million. New York’s First Gentleman, Bill Hochul, is senior vice president […]]]>

State lawmakers want the company that employs Governor Kathy Hochul’s husband to pay its workers more — or risk losing any chance of lucrative contracts at the new Buffalo Bills stadium it forced on US taxpayers State and local to the tune of $850 million.

New York’s First Gentleman, Bill Hochul, is senior vice president and general counsel for Delaware North, a company that operates “concessions, upscale restaurants, and retail services” in what is now Bills Stadium.

The sprawling company also operates a range of businesses on four continents, including a restaurant group that oversees catering services at places like the Empire State Building and the Metropolitan Opera, according to the company’s website.

Newly introduced legislation would require any company wishing to do business at state-funded professional sports facilities to pay restaurant branch workers the full minimum wage rather than the tip wage allowed by state law.

“We still have a two-tier minimum wage system… a starting point [changing things] is with this stadium, which is publicly funded, so we’re not using taxpayer dollars to fund sub-minimum wages,” Sen. Jabari Brisport (D-Brooklyn) told The Post. .

Assemblyman Ron Kim is one of the lawmakers pressuring Hochul about how much they pay workers.
Hans Pennink/AP

Restaurant workers in New York City earn as little as $10 an hour before tips, while their upstate counterparts earn even less.

Any company wishing to do business in publicly supported stadiums, arenas and related facilities should pay workers in restaurants and other services the lower state minimum wage of $15 or the minimum of 13 $.20 in upstate under a bill sponsored by Brisport and Assemblyman Ron Kim (D-Queens).

They say the legislation follows an agreement reached a few weeks ago by Erie County’s Hochul and the team owned by Florida billionaire couple Terry and Kim Pegula.

The state would pay at least $600 million of the $1.4 billion price tag for the controversial new stadium, with an additional $250 million coming from local county funds – a deal a recent poll shows most New Yorkers oppose it.

“If all this money is to be invested in stadiums, all stadiums that receive state money should contract with employers who pay minimum wage – not just in their stadiums but in all of their facilities,” said Saru Jayaraman, Chairman. of One Fair Wage supporting the bill, told the Post.

“They have the ability to pay the state minimum wage,” Kim said of Delaware North.

State Senator Jabari Brisport
Both Brisport and Kim support a bill that would require the stadium to pay its employees the state minimum wage.

The Queens Democrat added that he remained hopeful the bill could pass the Legislature before lawmakers leave Albany for the year on June 2.

The Hochul administration — which did not respond to a request for comment on the pending bill — said Bill Hochul is recused from state business.

But a potentially lucrative contract at the Bills’ future stadium would nonetheless help the bottom line of the company which paid him somewhere around half a million dollars last year, according to published financial disclosures by the governor’s office on Tuesday.

Advocacy groups like New York Communities for Change, the worker-backed Strong Economy for All coalition and One Fair Wage say the bill will help level the playing field for service and restaurant workers who have suffered the weight of the pandemic and historically high inflation.

“New York is one of 43 states that has this sub-minimum wage…And it’s now become virtually unlivable,” Jayaraman said.

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Virginia governor urges hiring faculty with ‘diverse’ views https://dawnforgovernor.org/virginia-governor-urges-hiring-faculty-with-diverse-views/ Mon, 16 May 2022 07:12:18 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/virginia-governor-urges-hiring-faculty-with-diverse-views/ Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin, a Republican, told college presidents last week that he expects them to promote free speech on campus and hire faculty and other members of the staff “with diverse political perspectives”. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. Youngkin sent the five-page letter to the Council of Presidents, setting out his expectations on a range […]]]>

Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin, a Republican, told college presidents last week that he expects them to promote free speech on campus and hire faculty and other members of the staff “with diverse political perspectives”. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported.

Youngkin sent the five-page letter to the Council of Presidents, setting out his expectations on a range of cultural issues important to his conservative political base — from in-person instruction during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic to establishing schools of lab as a kind of charter school outside of traditional K-12 public education. He also doesn’t want a tuition hike, which some Virginia colleges have proposed for next year.

He said free speech on campus was “an issue and a priority.” Many conservatives have talked about a speech by former Vice President Mike Pence at the University of Virginia. While some students said he shouldn’t appear on campus, he spoke, with support from the administration.

Youngkin said hiring professors with diverse opinions would “nurture a culture that prioritizes civil discourse and debate, both inside and outside the classroom.”

“This framework…policies and protocols should address annual faculty, staff, and student training, approaches to prioritizing the hiring of staff and faculty with diverse political perspectives, support for events and forums to model the exchange of ideas from different perspectives in a civil and productive manner, the set of non-negotiables that will not be tolerated on our campuses, and other measures to advance these fundamental freedoms on our campuses” , he wrote.

Larry Sabato, president of the UVA’s Center for Politics, said, “It’s become dogma on the right, and that’s what Youngkin feeds on.”

Sabato said he doesn’t oppose most of the governor’s stated goals, but he questioned the need to impose a framework on colleges and universities that are already tackling the issue. “I can only speak for one place, but where is the problem? ” He asked. “What is the problem we are trying to solve? »

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Video, audio, photos and quick transcript: Governor Hochul delivers remarks at University of Albany’s commencement ceremony https://dawnforgovernor.org/video-audio-photos-and-quick-transcript-governor-hochul-delivers-remarks-at-university-of-albanys-commencement-ceremony/ Sat, 14 May 2022 17:12:49 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/video-audio-photos-and-quick-transcript-governor-hochul-delivers-remarks-at-university-of-albanys-commencement-ceremony/ Earlier in the day, Governor Kathy Hochul delivered remarks at the University of Albany’s commencement ceremony. VIDEO of the event is available on YouTube here and in TV quality format (h.264, mp4) here. SOUND of the event is available here. PICTURES of the event will be available on the Governor’s Flickr page. A quick transcript […]]]>

Earlier in the day, Governor Kathy Hochul delivered remarks at the University of Albany’s commencement ceremony.

VIDEO of the event is available on YouTube here and in TV quality format (h.264, mp4) here.

SOUND of the event is available here.

PICTURES of the event will be available on the Governor’s Flickr page.

A quick transcript of the Governor’s remarks is available below:

hello graduates, are we racing today or what? Oh, I can feel the energy. What an exciting day for you. And first of all, to your parents, you can finally put away the checkbooks, the money is yours. You do not have to send it to this institution. Go have a good time, go to Disney World, whatever you do after those kids are gone.

So, to parents and family members, you too have been on this journey and you have inspired your children and loved ones with a desire to better themselves. And I find it phenomenal that a third of the graduates here today are coming out of an institution for the first time. So thank you to the families for the inspiration you have given them.

President Rodriguez, yes, leadership matters. And we’re so proud to have you leading this institution as we’re on the verge of transforming the entire SUNY system into a place where people, yes, it’s finally reached its full potential and we’re going to work together.

It’s great to have the Majority Leader for the entire Senate of the country, but our own Senator Chuck Schumer, you’ll hear very soon, what leader he is too.

We also have Tom Junod who will be your speaker today, I can’t wait to hear about him. And also, our student speaker, Che-Doni Platt. Thank you everybody. And I will be brief. Here is what I have to tell you.

You were students during a pandemic, did you notice it by any chance? Alright, I just want to see if you noticed anything different for a few years there. Very few young people or anyone in the world will be able to claim what you have had to endure.

You started in the first year, life was good, you make friends, you will continue for four years, you will understand everything later. You know, party a lot, have a good time, learn something once in a while. It’s OK. But all of a sudden the world has collapsed and you are no longer in person. Where are these friends? Where is this person you are going to ask on a date? Where did they go?

And all of a sudden, you don’t have that connection with teachers and friends anymore. And it was a tremendous isolation, because you had to endure the unthinkable. But the fact is, you endured. You thrived, you survived. And I’m telling you, when you come back here, for your 50th birthday, do you know what year it’s going to be? Understanding math students.

2072. You’re gonna come back and say, can you believe what we’ve been through? But I’m telling you right now, and you don’t know it yet, it makes you stronger, more resilient. Because no matter what happens to you – and a lot of bad things happen, a lot of good things too – but no matter what happens, you’re going to say, you know what? It’s not as bad as being in college during a pandemic and I survived that.

So always use that as a touchstone for how you can handle whatever comes your way, you’re set. But also, you are blessed to have this institution behind you. Everyone in this country knows that it is one of the best public research institutes not in the state but in the whole country and uses that label. This will put you in touch with elders and others. This will get you a job, my friends. So use it as we even continue to build the reputation of our SUNY education.

I’m gonna leave you with a question, because I know you don’t want to hear from me, you want to get outta here and party. I know life is waiting for you. I understand. I understand. But here’s something I’m going to ask you. You have the gift of an education, many people don’t. And my question to you is that when you come to that meeting in 50 years, be sure to introduce yourself, ask yourself a question now that I’m going to ask you to answer that day. Has my life made a difference? Did I do anything to improve the lives of others? Did I use my degree to lift people up? Did I participate in the fights of my day? Did I stand up and fight for women’s right to self-determination over their bodies? Did I stand up and fight for it? Did you participate in this fight? Are you part of this fight today? This is happening right now. Are you part of the fight to protect Mother Nature from further assault, so it’s not just for you, but for your children one day? Are you part of this fight? Did you get up?

Have you stood up and helped people living in poverty? New people are coming to this country in search of the American dream that feels so reversed and disrespectful. Have you fought for a criminal justice system that is truly a just system? Did you fight for there to be educational opportunities for everyone, not just for you? These are just a few of the areas I call on you as New Yorkers mostly, I know some of you are from around the world and from other states but you are all New Yorkers. Yorkers in my mind. You have to stay, you have to stay. I’ll help you find a place.

I want you to be part of this family because we have so many great things to do. It is within our reach. And we have this moral responsibility to take up the torch that was passed on to us that began in the state in 1848 with women’s rights and the right to reproductive freedom. It started in New York, three years before Roe V. Wade. The right to love whomever you choose and to marry whomever you choose. This is New York, birthplace of the LGBTQ movement. The environmental movement started here. The labor movement started here. It happened here by people like you.

This is what you must answer throughout your life. Did I make a difference? Think about it now. You have no excuse, you have no excuse. And I expect that from you as governor and also the first mother to hold that position, because I know how powerful a mother’s guilt is.

So I put it on your shoulders, students. Go out and do great things. Thank you for giving me the honor of speaking to you today. Take care all of you.

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Missouri Senate Sends New Congress Card to Governor, Ends Session Early | Policy https://dawnforgovernor.org/missouri-senate-sends-new-congress-card-to-governor-ends-session-early-policy/ Fri, 13 May 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/missouri-senate-sends-new-congress-card-to-governor-ends-session-early-policy/ JEFFERSON CITY — Opposition to a new congressional map collapsed on Thursday, and the Missouri Senate approved new boundaries for the state’s eight US House districts, sending the map to Gov. Mike Parson. A series of extraordinary events unfolded, allowing months of acrimonious debate to come to an end – along with all the other […]]]>

JEFFERSON CITY — Opposition to a new congressional map collapsed on Thursday, and the Missouri Senate approved new boundaries for the state’s eight US House districts, sending the map to Gov. Mike Parson.

A series of extraordinary events unfolded, allowing months of acrimonious debate to come to an end – along with all the other business. After approving the map, the Senate adjourned for the year, a day before its Friday deadline.

The new map will likely lead to the status quo in Missouri’s US House delegation: six Republicans and two Democrats, bolstering US Representative Ann Wagner’s St. Louis County-based 2nd Congressional District for the GOP .

A group of Republicans calling themselves the “Conservative Caucus” had sought an aggressive “7-1” Gerrymander to send seven Republicans to the U.S. House. Democrats believed that with their party winning more than 40% of the vote in the recent election, they should have a chance of winning three seats.

In March, the splinter group of Republicans finally accepted a “strong” 6-2 card that kept the two Democratic districts. The map placed four-fifths of St. Charles County’s population in the heavily Republican 3rd District, a victory for St. Charles County senses Bob Onder and Bill Eigel.

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The House rejected the map, sending a revised “6-2” map to the Senate on Monday in a last-ditch effort to complete the redistricting by the end of the legislative session at 6 p.m. Friday.

If lawmakers hadn’t acted, three federal judges would have been tasked with drawing the map of the state.

On Thursday, the Senate redistricting committee met at noon and was scheduled to hold a public hearing on the new plan for the House.

But Sen. Mike Bernskoetter, the chairman, quickly interrupted the proceedings by going into recess, and no hearing on the bill took place.

After 5 p.m., 12 Republicans used a rarely used Senate rule to “relieve” the House card from the committee, sending it straight to the Senate for debate.

Over procedural objections from Onder, a leader of the breakaway group, the chamber moved forward, bringing the bill to debate.

“Why exactly did you short-circuit the process by disbanding the committee and putting the bill straight on the schedule?” Onder asked Bernskoetter.

“I think there’s a group of us who think we’ve talked enough and filibustered enough and I think it’s time to let the process unfold and get the bill debated and vote for it,” Bernskoetter replied.

“Obviously what happened here, when the Senate redistricting committee was disbanded, was a sneak attack,” Onder said minutes later.

The map was approved by a 22-11 vote shortly before 8:30 p.m., but not before Republican senators shot each other on the floor.

“There is no doubt that this card that this body is likely to adopt today is an improvement over the (House Bill) 2117 card, the (Nancy) Pelosi card, the betrayal card, the sold out that this body – the leadership of this body – Republican so-called leadership,” Onder said, “tried to ram us down our throats.”

Onder and his allies argued that the original House map contained a 2nd District that was too pro-Democratic and likely to shy away from the GOP, deriding it as a “5-3” map.

“The victory I will claim,” Onder said, “is losing the Pelosi map, the 5-3 map.”

“I pray to God this is the last pontificate we have to hear from the senator from the second,” said Sen. Holly Thompson Rehder, R-Sikeston, who held a news conference in March to speak out against the filibuster group to its legislation revising the state’s Sexual Assault Survivors Bill of Rights.

She said that despite all the faction’s public talk of a ‘7-1’ map, the concept was not pushed into behind-the-scenes caucus sessions with other Republicans, suggesting the group was politically motivated. .

“Everyone — including every senator who wants to talk about it on their social media — knew” the 7-1 card was impossible because it was unconstitutional, Rehder said.

This week, the faction also derailed Rehder’s legislation implementing a wide range of health policy priorities, including legalizing needle exchanges in an effort to prevent disease transmission through the use of dirty needles.

“She’s angry that her needle-exchange bill didn’t cross the finish line,” said Sen. Denny Hoskins, R-Warrensburg, who is allied with the dissident faction.

He then called Rehder a “progressive Republican” and “definitely not a conservative.”

Hoskins had the final say in the exchange, with the card then going to a vote.

According to the plan, the 1st District, held by Rep. Cori Bush, D-St. Louis, would go further into the Webster Groves area with a “peninsula” that places voters in the Maplewood, Richmond Heights and Shrewsbury areas in the 2nd District.

Wagner’s 2nd District is set to expand from central and southern St. Louis County west to Warren and Franklin counties.

Eastern St. Charles County would be placed in the 3rd District. About three-quarters of St. Charles County’s population will be placed in 3rd, the plan’s sponsor said.

The House returns to action on Friday with votes likely on unfinished priorities such as legislation giving patients in healthcare facilities the right to visitors in response to limits introduced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Updated 10 p.m. Thursday, May 12.

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The Republican race for Pennsylvania governor: WPSU interviews Jake Corman https://dawnforgovernor.org/the-republican-race-for-pennsylvania-governor-wpsu-interviews-jake-corman/ Thu, 05 May 2022 20:10:26 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/the-republican-race-for-pennsylvania-governor-wpsu-interviews-jake-corman/ May 5, 2022 | 4:00 p.m. Anne Danahy/StateImpact Pennsylvania Anne Danahy has been a WPSU reporter since the fall of 2017. She was a reporter for nearly 12 years at the Daily Times Center at State College, Pennsylvania, where she won numerous awards for her coverage […]]]>



  • Anne Danahy/StateImpact Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Senate President Pro Tempore Jake Corman of R-Center County, seen here in a file photo in the WPSU-FM studio, is running for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in the 2022 primary.

Min Xian / WPSU

Pennsylvania Senate President Pro Tempore Jake Corman of R-Center County, seen here in a file photo in the WPSU-FM studio, is running for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in the 2022 primary.

Nine Republicans are vying for their party’s nomination for governor of Pennsylvania in the 2022 primary. The Democratic primary for governor is not competitive. WPSU has invited all Republican candidates for interviews leading up to the May 17 primary. Here is the conversation Anne Danahy of WPSU had with Jake Corman.

Anne Danahy
Jake Corman thanks for talking to us.

Jake Corman
Glad to be with you, as always.

Anne Danahy
You are the acting President of the Pennsylvania Senate, having served in the Senate since 1998. And you are also one of nine candidates in this race. You all agree on certain points. What sets you apart from other candidates?

Jake Corman
I think from my experience, you know, I’m the only one who really knows the process and how Harrisburg works and how to get things done. You know, I’ve spent a career tackling big issues, whether it’s issues like public pension reform, whether it’s issues like the governor’s shutdown, you know, jobs and state enterprises, whatever it is, I took the big problems and managed to solve them. A Corman administration won’t need a transition, we can step in from day one and understand the process, be able to work with the legislature. You know, we’ve had a governor for two years who hasn’t worked with the legislature at all. And so, you saw a malfunction. You want someone who can work with Republicans and Democrats, the Legislature so that the Legislative Branch, the Executive Branch can work together to improve the lives of the people of Pennsylvania. At the end of the day, it’s our job in public service, it’s to do things and make the lives of the people of Pennsylvania better. I have the skills and the ability of my experience to achieve this. And I look forward to the challenge.

Anne Danahy
And you said you wanted to get rid of mail-in voting, which was facilitated by Bill 77. It was bipartisan legislation passed before the pandemic, and you voted to allow mail-in voting. Why the change?

Jake Corman
Absolutely. Look, you know, Bill 77 was a bill to improve people’s abilities to access the vote, which is what we should all be for. Unfortunately, Governor Wolf made it a vessel for the opportunity to commit fraud. We are seeing this by now having several weeks of unapologetic mail-in voting. And then you combine that with the Dropbox, which was not passed by the legislator. It got rid of the verification of signatures on mail-in ballots, which was still part of the mail-in ballot process. And so what you saw, and we saw it in Lehigh County where we had more votes than people who showed up to Dropbox, and in Philadelphia County where they were supposed to keep the video of the drop boxes for two years by federal law. They didn’t keep it for some mysterious reason. By getting rid of all these security measures, you have sown doubt in the process. And that’s the worst thing you can have in a democracy – is there any doubt about who won and who lost. Look, elections come and go, don’t they? Republicans win some years, Democrats win some years. It is democracy. But everyone feels good about having the ability to affect change at the ballot box. We must do all we can to restore faith. And I think scrapping the system and then ultimately rebuilding it is the way to go. And and, you know, unfortunately, that’s where Tom Wolfe, the position he put us in. But I think it’s the right thing to do so that we can restore confidence in the electoral process.

Anne Danahy
Yes, and I will just note that there is no evidence of widespread voter fraud. I mean, someone casting a ballot for someone else might not be legal or allowed, but that doesn’t mean it’s fraud per se.

Jake Corman
One hundred percent. But it’s illegal. First of all, it has to stop. But I didn’t say there was widespread fraud. What I said is that we have clearly seen situations where there is the possibility of fraud, and we don’t know the extent of it, because the prosecutors do not prosecute these individuals, do not bring them to find out why they vote for other people. We don’t have the Philadelphia video at all. The problem is that we don’t have the capacity, the knowledge to know the extent of the illegal activity. The fact is that it is illegal and we should stop it. And I think that’s the best way to end it.

Anne Danahy
In this primary race, you have always been lower in the polls and not among the top. Why do you think that is?

Jake Corman
I think the leader in the polls throughout this campaign is the undecided voter. It’s clear. And so, you know, it’s my job and every candidate’s job to come out and make their case to the undecided voter. I think you see that the people for the most part, who are a bit ahead in the polls – although we’re all very close – are the people who have spent the most money, which is certainly not, you know, new to government and politics. And so, but there’s still a huge undecided voter. We plead our cause, until the end. I think my experience is a differentiator for me, like I said before, and we will continue to defend that until the end.

Anne Danahy
And you talked about jobs and job opportunities and making that a priority. What specific actions would you take if elected governor to improve these job opportunities in Pennsylvania?

Jake Corman
Excellent question. I mean, that’s the most important thing. So I think we start first by embracing energy conservation. Pennsylvania has a huge amount of natural resources. We have access to markets, we have superior education, intellectual capital like no other in the world that is being created here in Pennsylvania every year. Everyone should want to settle in Pennsylvania. Unfortunately, we have had a governor for the past eight years who is ideologically opposed to fossil fuels. And so, the great opportunity for job growth in Pennsylvania has been lost because it refuses to embrace it and find ways to be creative to create jobs. I will change that. I’ll make sure we’re creative just like we were with a tax credit program that located the Beaver Cracker facility in Beaver County by Royal Dutch Shell just like we did by creating a tax credit incentive policy in Luzerne County, a $6 billion investment. , 4,000 construction jobs and hundreds of permanent jobs. We shouldn’t have two examples, we should have a hundred. You know, whether people like it or not, you know, fossil fuels will be part of our future for decades to come on this planet. And either we can have dictators around the world who hate us and drive up energy costs for American consumers, as we’ve seen now with what’s happening in Russia and Ukraine. Or we could produce it domestically, which we do better for the environment than anywhere else in the world. We can create jobs here and benefit from them here.

Anne Danahy
And we have a few seconds left. In a few sentences, what would be your priority if you were elected?

Jake Corman
Well, my top priority is jobs and freedoms. Two years ago, this would probably have sounded like a cliché. But for the past two years, a governor told us, you know, who can go to work and who can’t go to work, you know. Whose work was essential and whose work was not essential. A President of the United States told us, you get vaccinated or you get fired. It’s an amazing thing to have in the United States of America. We are not talking about Russia and Putin, we are talking about the United States of America where our leaders are dictating our lives, something we are not used to and should never happen again. And that’s why we passed a law to make sure no governor could do what Tom Wolfe did, Republican governor or Democrat of the future. It is important that we protect our freedoms, to give people employment opportunities. Because you’re not really free if you don’t have economic security. It’s important that we create an environment where businesses will want to invest in Pennsylvania, to locate in Pennsylvania, to create jobs for Pennsylvanians, so they can provide for their families and support their businesses.

Jake Corman
And finally, I just want to mention, you know, we have a real crime problem in Pennsylvania. You know, the peak – since the riots of 2020. We’ve really seen this progressive movement of not holding people accountable has really spiked our crime problem in Pennsylvania. That’s why I’m so proud to have the statewide FOP recommend my candidacy. And because again, we can’t have freedom, we can’t have good jobs, if we don’t have safe communities. And as Governor, I will fight this fight with our men and women in uniform to keep our communities safe.

Anne Danahy
Senator Jake Corman, thank you for speaking to us.

Jake Corman
Thank you. Always a pleasure to be with you Anne.


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Most Republicans vying to be Oregon’s next governor applaud potential abortion restrictions https://dawnforgovernor.org/most-republicans-vying-to-be-oregons-next-governor-applaud-potential-abortion-restrictions/ Tue, 03 May 2022 23:39:53 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/most-republicans-vying-to-be-oregons-next-governor-applaud-potential-abortion-restrictions/ Oregon leaders often praise the state’s strong reproductive rights protections, which are codified in the state constitution. But most Republican gubernatorial candidates say they would work to reduce those protections if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade. In response to a questionnaire sent to candidates this spring by the OPB, five candidates — […]]]>

Oregon leaders often praise the state’s strong reproductive rights protections, which are codified in the state constitution. But most Republican gubernatorial candidates say they would work to reduce those protections if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade.

In response to a questionnaire sent to candidates this spring by the OPB, five candidates — Stan Pulliam, Bob Tiernan, Bridge Barton, Amber Richardson and Bill Sizemore — said they would implement new restrictions on abortions in Oregon. None delved into what that would look like.

Four others – Court Boice, Tim McCloud, Brandon Merritt and Nick Hess – said they would support an electoral referendum to remove abortion protections from the Oregon constitution.

Only one, Jessica Gomez, founder and CEO of Rogue Valley Microdevices, said she would not pursue any new reproductive health restrictions.

And in a debate moderated on Tuesday by the City Club of Portland and KGW, the topic of what happens if Roe leaves has emerged as one of the cardinal issues for GOP candidates. They spent more than 10 minutes of the 90-minute forum debating news that the United States Supreme Court may be about to overturn the Roe decision and its impact in Oregon.

Four frontrunners – Jessica Gomez, Bud Pierce, Stan Pulliam and Bridget Barton – were asked what the new ruling means for their plans as governor.

FILE: Oregon’s capitol building in May 2021. Most Republican gubernatorial candidates in Oregon applaud potential additional restrictions on abortion.

Kristyna Wentz-Graff/OPB

Gomez doubled down, saying she is firmly “pro-choice” and supports that abortion is a constitutionally protected right. She, however, opposes the use of Oregon taxpayer money to help pregnant women in other states access abortions here.

Oncologist and 2016 GOP candidate Bud Pierce has described himself as “pro-life” but said he believes in respecting federal and state laws and would rather focus his efforts on supporting pregnant women in terms of childcare and education so that they feel less pressure to have an abortion.

“My effort will be to support pregnant women so that they want to continue their pregnancy if they wish,” Pierce said.

Pierce was pressed into the debate for what a moderator described as a “flip-flop” on the abortion issue; during his 2016 campaign, he said he supported the state’s reproductive health care access policies. Pierce said he didn’t do an about-face, but reassessed his position after his wife passed away in 2020.

Bridget Barton, a Conservative author and political consultant, said she supported the High Court’s seemingly forthcoming ruling and disagreed with current state policies.

She said she would revisit funding set aside by the Oregon Legislature that helps people in Oregon and other states access abortions here. State legislators recently approved $15 million for the state’s Reproductive Health Equity Fund in response to new laws or efforts to restrict access in states like Texas, Idaho, Mississippi and Florida.

“Millions of dollars allocated for what we now call ‘abortion vacations’ for out-of-state people to come here and use our taxpayer dollars for their abortions,” she said. “Most Oregonians, I believe, disagree with that.”

Stan Pulliam, the mayor of Sandy, took the most aggressive view in terms of restricting access to abortion. He released a statement on Tuesday saying, “I’ve been waiting for this moment my whole life.”

In the debate, he attacked his opponents for being, in his view, too progressive on their views on reproductive rights. He noted that he was not endorsed by the advocacy group Oregon Right to Life, which approved four other candidates: Pierce, former House Minority Leader Christine Drazan, Barton and Tiernan.

“I hope Oregon Right to Life, its board of directors, its funders and its activists are watching this debate,” he said. “These responses are a complete embarrassment to anyone who has received the Oregon Right to Life endorsement.”

Pulliam said he would sign any “pro-life legislation” into law. (The odds of such legislation making it to any governor’s desk remain fairly slim given the Democratic Party’s firm grip on both houses of the Oregon legislature.)

Pulliam went on to criticize Christine Drazan, another top Republican candidate and former Oregon House Minority Leader, particularly for her views on reproductive rights.

“I think Oregon Right to Life, on the heels of last week’s televised debate, with a watered-down response from Christine Drazan where she said she would only veto deals that expanded access to ‘abortion…they should review their endorsement,’ Pulliam mentioned.

Drazan dropped out of the City Club of Portland/KGW debate on Tuesday just hours before it was due to start. Her campaign staff noted that she had participated in several public debates and forums, including two televised debates in recent weeks.

Drazan’s campaign did not immediately respond to the OPB’s request for comment on its views on reproductive rights and abortion access. She declined to complete the questionnaire sent out by the OPB this spring, and she did not respond to requests to discuss her campaign and speak out about the issues on OPB’s Think Out Loud.

The two most prominent Democratic gubernatorial candidates, State Treasurer Tobias Read and former Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek, both support current abortion protections in Oregon. . Betsy Johnson, a longtime state lawmaker who is trying to collect enough signatures to contest the November general election ballot as an unaffiliated candidate, also said she supports Oregon’s existing laws.

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Governor Walz nominates Elise Larson de Brainerd to Minnesota Court of Appeals https://dawnforgovernor.org/governor-walz-nominates-elise-larson-de-brainerd-to-minnesota-court-of-appeals/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 04:21:45 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/governor-walz-nominates-elise-larson-de-brainerd-to-minnesota-court-of-appeals/ Governor Tim Walz has appointed attorney Brainerd Elise Larson to the Minnesota Court of Appeals. The announcement fell Thursday, April 28. Larson, who is the daughter of Laine Larson, Superintendent of Brainerd Public Schools, will fill the position vacated by the Honorable James B. Florey after his retirement. The seat Larson will occupy is for […]]]>

Governor Tim Walz has appointed attorney Brainerd Elise Larson to the Minnesota Court of Appeals. The announcement fell Thursday, April 28.

Larson, who is the daughter of Laine Larson, Superintendent of Brainerd Public Schools, will fill the position vacated by the Honorable James B. Florey after his retirement. The seat Larson will occupy is for a resident of the eighth congressional district.

Elise Larson
Credit: Office of Governor Tim Walz and Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan

“She is a remarkable lawyer who has excelled at every stage of her career,” Governor Walz said in a press release. “Her extensive experience in the practice of civil and administrative law – and her experience as a clerk to some of the most renowned judges in the region – have prepared her well for the bench.

Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan also praised Larson and his qualifications. “[Larson] is highly skilled, civic-minded, and passionate about public service and equity. I am convinced that she will be an excellent judge.

Larson’s background includes serving as water program director and senior counsel at the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy. She is also an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota Law School. In this position, Larson teaches environmental law and oversees the Environmental and Energy Law Clinic.

She previously served as law clerk for Chief Justice Lorie Gildea on the Supreme Court of Minnesota, Justice Myron Bright on the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, and Chief Justice John Tunheim on the United States District Court. United for the District of Minnesota. At Briggs and Morgan PA Larson was a lawyer. In complex litigation, she has represented private sector clients.

Larson earned a BA from Concordia College. She later earned her JD from the University of Minnesota Law School.

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Oklahoma House sends governor Texas-style abortion ban https://dawnforgovernor.org/oklahoma-house-sends-governor-texas-style-abortion-ban/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 15:05:59 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/oklahoma-house-sends-governor-texas-style-abortion-ban/ OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma House gave final approval Thursday to a Texas-style abortion ban that bans the procedure after about six weeks of pregnancy, before many women know they are pregnant. the invoice approved by the GOP-led House on a 68-12 vote without discussion or debate is now heading to Republican Gov. Kevin […]]]>

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma House gave final approval Thursday to a Texas-style abortion ban that bans the procedure after about six weeks of pregnancy, before many women know they are pregnant.

the invoice approved by the GOP-led House on a 68-12 vote without discussion or debate is now heading to Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt, who is expected to sign it within days. The attack on abortion rights is one of many culture war issues conservatives in GOP-led states have embraced, such as restricting LGBTQ rights, motivating the party’s base in an election year.

Dubbed the Oklahoma Heartbeat Act, the bill bans abortions once heart activity can be detected in the fetus, which experts say is about six weeks into a pregnancy. A similar bill approved in Texas last year led to a dramatic reduction in the number of abortions performed in that state, sending many women to seek the procedure in Oklahoma and other surrounding states.

Although Stitt already signed a bill earlier this year to make abortion a criminal offense in Oklahoma, the measure is not expected to take effect until later this summer and may not withstand a legal challenge.

Because the measure approved Thursday has an “emergency” provision, it takes effect immediately after the governor signs it, and abortion providers say they will end most abortions in Oklahoma immediately.

“We are more concerned at this point about these Texas-style bans because they have, at least recently, been able to continue and remain in effect,” said Emily Wales, interim president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Great Plains, which operates two abortion services. clinics in Oklahoma. “We intend to challenge them if they are passed, but due to the provisions of the emergency clause there would be at least a period of time during which we could not provide care.”

Like in Texas, the bill allows private citizens to sue abortion providers or anyone who helps a woman obtain an abortion for up to $10,000, a mechanism the U.S. Supreme Court has authorized to Stay in place. The new Texas law has led to a huge increase in the number of women from Texas seeking abortions in Oklahoma.

“We serve as many Texans as Oklahomans right now, in some cases more Texans than Oklahomans,” Wales said.

Before the Texas ban went into effect last year, about 40 Texas women had abortions each month in Oklahoma, according to data from the Oklahoma State Department of Health. That number rose to 222 Texas women in September and 243 in October, the agency reported.

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A 60 day history | Office of Governor Pete Ricketts https://dawnforgovernor.org/a-60-day-history-office-of-governor-pete-ricketts/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 23:28:02 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/a-60-day-history-office-of-governor-pete-ricketts/ A 60 day history By Governor Pete Ricketts April 26, 2022 Governor’s Official Photo here. The 2022 legislative session will go down in history as one of the best in unicameral Nebraska. In just 60 days, the legislature passed record tax relief, made critical improvements to public safety, and invested in generational water resource projects. […]]]>

A 60 day history

By Governor Pete Ricketts

April 26, 2022

Governor’s Official Photo here.

The 2022 legislative session will go down in history as one of the best in unicameral Nebraska. In just 60 days, the legislature passed record tax relief, made critical improvements to public safety, and invested in generational water resource projects. As if that weren’t enough, the senators also allocated $1.04 billion in US federal Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding.

Here are some of the highlights of this historic session.

Tax relief

The crowning glory was tax relief. As we approached this session, we had provided $4 billion in direct property tax relief over the past eight years. The tax package I enacted, LB 873, provides an additional $3.4 billion in tax relief to Nebraskanians through the 2027 tax year. When fully implemented, LB 873 will provide 12 times the tax relief from any tax relief bill passed in any previous administration.

LB 873 is significant for Nebraska. Our seniors will see an accelerated removal of state taxation of Social Security income, which will now be fully exempt in the 2025 tax year. This keeps more money in the pockets of our seniors face rising inflation and encourages them to stay in Nebraska to see their grandchildren grow up.

Nebraskanians can now be confident that property tax relief will continue. BA 873 makes permanent the property tax relief enacted in 2020. This year, taxpayers received a 25.3% rebate from the state on what they paid to their local schools in property taxes. Additionally, the tax package creates a new rebate on property taxes paid to community colleges. The refund will be $50 million for the 2022 tax year and will increase to $195 million by the 2026 tax year.

Our hard-working middle-class families will get much-needed tax relief through a reduction in their income tax rates. We will reduce the tax rate from 6.84% to 5.84% by the 2027 tax year. The legislation ensures that our businesses will also have a tax rate of 5.84% by the same year. These changes will allow Nebraska to be more competitive with neighboring states.

public safety

This session, senators embraced Nebraskas’ strong support for law enforcement and made strategic improvements to public safety.

The Legislature followed my recommendation to allocate $47.7 million to add capacity to the Nebraska Law Enforcement Training Center on Grand Island. This investment will allow our new recruits to receive unparalleled training. Senators also approved my $16.9 million proposal to upgrade and expand our State Patrol Crime Lab. This will ensure the State Patrol’s ability to effectively process evidence and bring justice to victims of crime.

In addition, we have enacted laws to strengthen our law enforcement personnel. We’ve established reciprocity for out-of-state law enforcement officers to help them find jobs faster after moving to Nebraska. We’ve also helped law enforcement agencies recruit and retain officers by paying incentives for years of service. We provided tax relief on health care premiums to retired law enforcement officers age 60 and older with more than 20 years of service. And the state will provide a 100% tuition waiver for law enforcement who study in the university system, state colleges, or community colleges.

At a time when others are defunding the police, Nebraska is demonstrating its commitment to the women and men who don blue to protect our communities.

Water resources

The unicameral has made additional investments for future generations of Nebraskas. This spring, I signed historic legislation to protect and develop our water resources.

We enacted LB 1015 to authorize construction of the Perkins County Canal, which will protect our water flows from the South Platte River. Nebraskans currently depend on this water for their drinking water supply, agricultural irrigation, power generation, and the health of our natural environment. Thanks to LB 1015, we will be able to move this vital project forward immediately.

The Legislature also gave the green light to other water infrastructure projects through LB 1023. Senators approved four major projects proposed by the STAR WARS committee: construction of a new marina at Lake McConaughy; a major marina expansion at Lewis and Clark Lake; construction of an event center and lodge at Niobrara State Park; and creation of a 3,600-acre reservoir between Lincoln and Omaha. These investments will expand Nebraska’s water resources to generate additional recreational and tourism opportunities.

Pandemic recovery

Senators also passed a $1.04 billion ARPA budget to deal with the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic. Among other provisions: it invests $60 million to increase the capacity of our community colleges; it allocates over $120 million for affordable housing; it is spending $100 million on shovel-ready projects delayed by the pandemic; boosting health care by investing in behavioral health facilities and a rural health complex in Kearney; and it creates subsidies to increase meat processing capacity for the benefit of our agricultural producers and consumers.

Lawmakers also passed major legislation to revitalize urban areas affected by the coronavirus. LB 1024 creates economic stimulus grants to support job training, small business growth, and land development in North Omaha, South Omaha, and other eligible census tracts statewide.

In addition to these ARPA investments, the senators prioritized growth in rural Nebraska by extending and expanding the Nebraska Rural Development Act. They also created tax credits to encourage fuel retailers to sell E15 and higher ethanol blends.

In my end-of-session address to the Legislative Assembly, I summed up all of these accomplishments in one word: Wow! Any one of them would have been considered historic, but the four past efforts in a short 60-day session are truly remarkable.

If you have questions about the legislation passed in the 2022 session, please email pete.ricketts@nebraska.gov or call 402-471-2244.

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State Sen. Brian Dahle Wins GOP Gubernatorial Nomination https://dawnforgovernor.org/state-sen-brian-dahle-wins-gop-gubernatorial-nomination/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 02:46:00 +0000 https://dawnforgovernor.org/state-sen-brian-dahle-wins-gop-gubernatorial-nomination/ The California Republican Party endorsed Sen. Brian Dahle for governor on Sunday, a contentious battle between four candidates that took multiple ballots to reach the 60% threshold required for party approval. Dahle, a family farmer from Lassen County who has spent more than a quarter century in elected office, told delegates he was most qualified […]]]>

The California Republican Party endorsed Sen. Brian Dahle for governor on Sunday, a contentious battle between four candidates that took multiple ballots to reach the 60% threshold required for party approval.

Dahle, a family farmer from Lassen County who has spent more than a quarter century in elected office, told delegates he was most qualified because of his experience in government and as a father.

“I want your children and my children to have the same opportunities that we had. But that’s not going to happen if we don’t deliver a blow to freedom this year,’ he said at a candidates’ forum on Saturday, adding that incumbent Gov. Gavin Newsom and other Democrats are vulnerable in because of tax rates, poverty and crime. in California. “Delegates, we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The wind is at our back. Californians are looking for a better choice.

Although Dahle ultimately received the votes to win the endorsement, it was not without controversy. Some delegates muttered that establishment party leaders were trying to give him victory. And then on Friday, Dahle’s wife’s Assembly committee transferred $40,500 to the state party, leading GOP gubernatorial rival Jenny Rae Le Roux to say that the endorsement had been “bought”. She was calling on the party to return the money when her microphone was cut off during the candidates’ forum.

A state party official called the claim “nothing burger,” saying all members of the House Republican caucus should raise a similar amount for party coffers. But the timing of the transfer – two days before the approval vote – was viewed with skepticism by many participants.

Approval votes were held on the final day of the state’s GOP convention in Anaheim. Much of the energy at the rally focused on whether Republicans should take over Congress, a recognition of the party’s straits in statewide contests. Democrats had a nearly 23 percentage point advantage over Republicans in March, and the GOP hasn’t won a statewide election since 2006. Last year’s effort to recall Newsom, who sparked great excitement among Tories because enough voters signed petitions to qualify for the ballot, trailed by nearly 24 points.

To qualify to compete for State Party endorsement, applicants must receive the signatures of 200 delegates. Candidates can show their formal party support on direct mail and other campaign communications – useful in short-ballot races that receive little media coverage – and have access to party data, staff and offices. It also provides access to state party financial resources, but that money is much more likely to be spent on competitive congressional races.

Other nominees who won endorsements included attorney Mark Meuser for the U.S. Senate, education policy officer Lance Christensen for state superintendent of public instruction, former federal prosecutor Nathan Hochman for attorney general, GOP policy expert and academic Lanhee Chen for comptroller and former Lancaster City Councilwoman Angela Underwood Jacobs for lieutenant governor.

The party could not reach a consensus in the races for Treasurer or Secretary of State. In the latter contest, contestant Rachel Hamm told delegates on Saturday that despite what they may have heard, she was not a “satanic witch.”

“I’m a 45-year-old devout Christian, actually,” said Hamm, who has been endorsed by notable figures in former President Trump’s orbit, including former national security adviser Michael Flynn and the MyPillow CEO, Mike Lindell.

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